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Training Section

Tony Dziepak


This is a primer on training geared toward the beginner to intermediate thrower. The target audience is the high school thrower, but it can also apply to the youth and collegiate thrower. More extensive information can be found on other websites in the "other links" section.


CONTENTS:
Introduction
Conditioning
Plyometrics
Weight training
Scheduling a training plan
Technique
Shot preliminaries, power position, and follow through
Basic Spin (rotational) shot approach
Basic Glide (linear) shot approach
Tips
Throwing drills
Mental and psychological aspects
Recovery, including nutrition and rest (coming later)
Character, including sportsmankike conduct, academic-athletic-social balance, and time management (coming later).


INTRODUCTION

There are three main aspects of preparation in practice that will help you to throw farther in competition: conditioning, technique, and psychological.

Conditioning includes the progressive physical training of your body and subsequent rest and proper nutrition so that it becomes stronger and adapted to the physical demands of throwing. Typical conditioning activities for throwing include some running--short sprints, strides, and intervals, plyometrics, and weight training. Throwing and throwing drills also contribute to conditioning.

Technique involves learning the specific movements that will lead to far throws. Technique is learned through throwing, throwing drills, stydying film of elite throwers, and watching videos of yourself to look for areas for improvement. Technique improves/changes with improved conditioning because top technique requires good explosive strength.

The mental aspects of competition include gaining good body awareness and coordination, and gaining competition savvy. Body awareness can be developed through general agility drills, gymnastic exercises, and balancing drills. An athlete with good body awareness can make minor corrections in technique during mid-throw, and is better able to keep from fouling after release. Competition savvy is gained through proper mental preparation and competition experience.

Website address:   http://throwerspage.uphero.com